The Scissors of Science

Three centuries ago the average life expectancy in Europe was between 33 and 40 years. Interestingly, 33 was also the average life expectancy in the Palaeolithic era, 2.6 million years ago. What is that we’ve got in the last three centuries that we hadn’t got in all the time before? Well, science!

Science did a lot of miracles. But like all things that do miracles, it quickly turned into a religion. A God that most people in the Western world believe in today. And like all believers, when science fails, we may think it has not advanced in that area yet, but we don’t think there is anything wrong with science itself. Or when the data doesn’t match, we think it’s because those scientists are not very good at statistics. Or, if not that, then simply the problem is with failed control over scientific publications, as it was concluded three years ago, when Begley and Ellis published a shocking study that they were able to reproduce only 11 per cent of the original cancer research findings.

Well, I believe that the problem with science is more fundamental than that.

The word science comes from skei, which means “to cut, to divide”. The same is the root of scissors, schizophrenia and shit. “Dividing” when applied to science, comes handy to explain some fundamental problems with it. It has at least the following six manifestations. Continue reading